Graduates Fault Advice of Guidance Counselors

A new study shows why guidance counselors need the support of student success programs that give them the skills and tools to be effective in their jobs. The Public Agenda reports that,Most young adults who go on to college believe that the advice of their high school guidance counselors was inadequate and often impersonal and perfunctory. Most troubling, and potentially significant for policy makers,” the study added, “is that young people who characterized their interactions with guidance counselors as anonymous and unhelpful were less likely to go directly from high school into a postsecondary program.”

LifeBound is proactive in working with counselors across the country to solve the very problems cited in this article. Our stair-step program for every grade, 5-12, addresses the academic and developmental issues specific to each grade level. For instance, our PEOPLE SMARTS book addresses behavior and motivation issues by helping students become emotionally intelligent. Our new edition of MAKING THE MOST OF HIGH SCHOOL, is designed to help students develop an eight-year academic plan starting their freshmen year. We’ve had outstanding results in giving counselors the methods for impacting students in positive ways and developing their leadership skills through coaches training so they have greater credibility and influence in their districts. Many of the counselors who’ve completed our academic coaches training classes have been promoted to district level positions. For review copies of LifeBound’s materials, please email contact@lifebound.com or call toll free 1.877.737.8510. We look forward to hearing from you.How can we help counselors solve the myriad of problems they face in their profession and give them the tools to be more effective in their roles?What can we do to better engage students and families in the college and career planning process?

 

How can we elevate the counseling profession so that it fulfills its mission as set by the American School Counselor Association?

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New York Times

by Jacques Steinberg

Most people who graduated from high school in the last dozen years believe that their guidance counselors provided little meaningful advice about college or careers, a new study has found. And many said the best advice on their futures came from teachers. “Most young adults who go on to college believe that the advice of their high school guidance counselors was inadequate and often impersonal and perfunctory,” according to the study by Public Agenda, a nonprofit research organization. “Most troubling, and potentially significant for policy makers,” the study added, “is that young people who characterized their interactions with guidance counselors as anonymous and unhelpful were less likely to go directly from high school into a postsecondary program.” To view the entire article visit
http://nyti.ms/bxLm3x

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